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July 2024

What Is Morton’s Neuroma?

Morton's neuroma is a painful condition affecting the ball of the foot, resulting from a thickening of tissue around a nerve, often between the third and fourth toes. Symptoms include a burning sensation, tingling, or numbness in the affected area, along with the feeling of a small pebble or lump underfoot. Pain may worsen with activity or wearing tight shoes. Treatment options for Morton's neuroma focus on relieving pressure on the affected nerve. This includes wearing shoes with a wider toe box or adding padding to support the arch and alleviate pressure. Avoiding activities that worsen symptoms also helps. Podiatrists may recommend corticosteroid injections to reduce inflammation, or in severe cases, surgical removal of the neuroma. Early intervention ensures effective management, relieving discomfort and restoring foot function. Visiting a podiatrist is suggested for a precise diagnosis and personalized treatment plan.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact the podiatrists of Boston Common Podiatry. Our doctors will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Boston, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Peripheral Neuropathy and Its Impact on the Feet

Peripheral neuropathy results from damage to the peripheral nerves, which transmit signals between the central nervous system and the rest of the body. This damage often leads to numbness, tingling, burning, and sharp pain in the feet. Diabetic neuropathy occurs in individuals with diabetes as a result of prolonged high blood sugar levels that damage the nerves. Symptoms in the feet may include a loss of sensation, making it difficult to detect injuries or a feeling of wearing tight socks when barefoot. These symptoms can significantly impact balance and mobility, increasing the risk of falls and infections. Proper management of blood sugar levels, in addition to medications and lifestyle changes, may help to alleviate symptoms of neuropathy. If you are experiencing any of the above symptoms, it is suggested that you confer with a podiatrist who can help you to manage this condition.

Neuropathy

Neuropathy can be a potentially serious condition, especially if it is left undiagnosed. If you have any concerns that you may be experiencing nerve loss in your feet, consult with the podiatrists from Boston Common Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment for neuropathy.

What Is Neuropathy?

Neuropathy is a condition that leads to damage to the nerves in the body. Peripheral neuropathy, or neuropathy that affects your peripheral nervous system, usually occurs in the feet. Neuropathy can be triggered by a number of different causes. Such causes include diabetes, infections, cancers, disorders, and toxic substances.

Symptoms of Neuropathy Include:

  • Numbness
  • Sensation loss
  • Prickling and tingling sensations
  • Throbbing, freezing, burning pains
  • Muscle weakness

Those with diabetes are at serious risk due to being unable to feel an ulcer on their feet. Diabetics usually also suffer from poor blood circulation. This can lead to the wound not healing, infections occurring, and the limb may have to be amputated.

Treatment

To treat neuropathy in the foot, podiatrists will first diagnose the cause of the neuropathy. Figuring out the underlying cause of the neuropathy will allow the podiatrist to prescribe the best treatment, whether it be caused by diabetes, toxic substance exposure, infection, etc. If the nerve has not died, then it’s possible that sensation may be able to return to the foot.

Pain medication may be issued for pain. Electrical nerve stimulation can be used to stimulate nerves. If the neuropathy is caused from pressure on the nerves, then surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Boston, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Are Bunions Affecting Your Everyday Life?

Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Different Types of Open Foot Wounds

Open wounds on the feet are injuries that break the skin's surface, leaving underlying tissue exposed. Each type of open wound has distinct signs and characteristics. Abrasions, commonly referred to as scrapes, occur when skin on the foot experiences superficial damage from rubbing against a rough surface. Lacerations are cuts caused by sharp objects, which may vary in depth and severity depending on the force of the injury. Puncture wounds in the foot occur when a sharp object penetrates the skin, creating a small hole that can lead to deep tissue damage and infection if not properly treated. Avulsions, which often result from traumatic injuries in feet, involve the tearing away of skin and tissue from the body. Surgical wounds are intentional incisions made during surgical procedures. These open-foot wounds require careful monitoring and care to prevent complications during and after the procedure. Diabetic ulcers are open wounds often found on the feet of diabetics, resulting from poor circulation and nerve damage. Regardless of the type, appropriate wound care can decrease risk of infection in the foot and promote healing. If you're experiencing challenges with open wounds, it's suggested to consult with a podiatrist for effective treatment and management, reducing complications and supporting a successful recovery.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with the podiatrists from Boston Common Podiatry. Our doctors will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Boston, MA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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